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New Spring Courses

December 18, 2014

 

Are men and women’s brains really wired differently? How can philosophy respond to the Holocaust? Discuss these questions and more in our new spring courses.

ENGLISH

ST: LGBT Literature & Culture (ENGL 395.001)
This new course examines writing in English by lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender writers. Readings will include fiction, memoir, graphic novel, poetry and drama. Topics include: facing homophobia, gender identity and expression, HIV/AIDS, art and politics, and the intersections of sexuality, gender, race and class.

This 3.0 credit course, taught by André Carrington, PhD, is open to all students who have passed ENGL 103 or ENGL 105, and will meet on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays, 1 – 1:50 p.m. Location TBD.

PHILOSOPHY

Contemporary Feminist Theory (PHIL 475.001 / SCTS 600.001)
This course surveys contemporary feminist theory with an emphasis on “new materialist” approaches to sex and sexual difference. An umbrella term, new materialism refers to a variety of recent attempts to re-imagine nature, sex, body and matter. During the “linguistic turn” of the 20th century, many postmodern feminists retreated from these materials and their associated sciences; enamored of texts but allergic to bodies, postmodern feminists tended to embrace radical constructivism and reject scientific methods and knowledge. Today, new materialists return to biology, nature, sex, body and matter in order to move beyond the logics of essentialism and somatophobia. This course will survey the results of this return with a special emphasis on understandings of sex and sexual difference.

This 3.0 credit course, taught by Sarah Hansen, PhD, is open to all students above the sophomore level and meets Monday evenings, 6 – 8:50 p.m. Location TBD. For more information, contact the instructor at sarah.k.hansen@drexel.edu.

Philosophy and the Holocaust (PHIL 475.002)
How can philosophy respond to the Holocaust, the annihilation of six million Jews by Nazi Germany? Can philosophy at all account for or come to terms with the mass destruction of human lives on such a grand technological scale? Or does moral theory fall short in the face of such an overwhelming act of genocide? This course will explore these and other questions through a study of the philosophical responses to the Holocaust. Topics covered will include collective guilt, evil, the limits of language, the responsibility of artists, the mechanized destruction of human life in concentration camps, the legacy of the Enlightenment, as well as ethical issues involved in the study, representation and memorialization of the Holocaust. The readings will include works by Hannah Arendt, Hans Jonas, Emmanuel Levinas, Theodor Adorno, Jacques Derrida, Giorgio Agamben and Berel Lang.

This 3.0 credit course, taught by Adam Knowles, PhD, is open to all students above the sophomore level and meets Tuesdays and Thursdays, 5– 6:20 p.m. Location TBD. For more information, contact the instructor at ajk358@drexel.edu.

Theoretical and Sociological Aspects of Measurement (PHIL 481.001 / SCTS 660.001)
This course familiarizes students with theoretical and sociological issues related to measurement by focusing on topics at the crossroads of the history and philosophy of science and technology. These topics include the notion of theory, the nature and epistemology of experiments, and related themes of instrumentation, measurement and coordination.

This 3.0 credit course, taught by Flavia Padovani, PhD, is open to all students above the sophomore level and meets Tuesday evenings, 6:30 to 9:20 pm. Location TBD. For more information, contact the instructor at fp72@drexel.edu.

PSYCHOLOGY

ST: Cognitive Neuroscience (PSY 480.001)
Cognitive neuroscience is the bridge between cognitive psychology and neuroscience: how the “hardware” of our brains produces the “software” of thought. In this course, students will discuss the neural basis of core cognitive processes such as perception, attention, memory, language and executive functions. From movies like “Memento” and “Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind” to eye-catching headlines like “Men and women's brains are wired differently” (BBC, December 2013) and “A neuron with Halle Berry’s name on it" (NYTimes, July 2005), cognitive neuroscience is all around us. The goal of this course is to immerse students in the research behind the splashy stories, so that they can become better consumers (and perhaps creators) of the growing knowledge of the human brain.

This 3.0 credit course, taught by Daniel Mirman, PhD, is open to all students above freshman level, and will meet on Tuesdays and Thursdays, 12:30-1:50 p.m. Location TBD.