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Jennifer Stanford

Jennifer Stanford, PhD

Assistant Professor
Department of Biology
Office: PISB 425
jss75@drexel.edu
Phone: 215.895.6180

Education:

  • BS, Biology, Elizabethtown College
  • PhD, Cell and Developmental Biology, Harvard University, Ruderman Lab
  • Post-Doc, Cell Biology Education, Harvard Medical School

Research Interests:

My research interests focus on evaluating and improving approaches to teach STEM content in higher education environments to promote student learning, engagement in STEM courses, and STEM student retention. My current work focuses on: evaluating approaches to increase student access to undergraduate research opportunities, incorporating evidence-based thinking into diverse learning environments, and developing practical training opportunities to support STEM student professional development.

Specialization:

STEM Education, Undergraduate Research, Cell Biology Education, Increasing Diversity in the STEM Pipeline

Selected Publications:

  • Stanford, J.S. and Duwel, L.E. (2013) Engaging Biology Undergraduates in the Scientific Process through Writing a Theoretical Research Proposal. Bioscene: Journal of College Biology Teaching 38: 17-23.
  • Bentley, A.M., Artavanis-Tsakonas, S., and J.S. Stanford. (2007) Nanocourses: a New Short Course Format as an Educational Tool in a Biological Sciences Graduate Curriculum. CBE Life Sci Educ 7: 175-83.
  • Stanford, J.S. and J.V. Ruderman. (2005) Changes in Regulatory Phosphorylation of Cdc25C Ser387 and Wee1 Ser549 During Normal Cell Cycle Progression and Checkpoint Arrests. Mol Biol Cell 16: 5749-60.
  • Stanford, J.S., Lieberman, S.L., Wong, V.L., and J.V. Ruderman. (2003) Regulation of the G2/M transition in oocytes of Xenopus tropicalis. Dev Biol 260: 438-48.
  • Duckworth, B.C., Weaver (Stanford), J.S., and J.V. Ruderman. (2002) G2 arrest in Xenopus oocytes is dependent on phosphorylation of cdc25 by protein kinase A. Proc Natl Acad Sci 99: 16794-9.
  • D’Amico, A.V. and Stanford, J. (2009) Probiotic use and clindamycin-induced hypercholesterolemia. J Altern Complement Med 15: 470-1.