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Kelly Joyce

Kelly Joyce, PhD

Director, Center for Science, Technology & Society
Professor of Sociology
Center for Science, Technology and Society
Department of Sociology
Office: 3600 Market Street, Room 730
Phone: 215.571.4449


  • PhD, Sociology, Boston College
  • BA, Anthropology, Brown University

Curriculum Vitae:

Download [PDF]

Research Interests:

  • Science and Technology Studies
  • Healthcare and Medicine
  • Qualitative Social Science Methods
  • Aging


Kelly Joyce, PhD, is a Professor in the Department of Sociology and Director of the Science, Technology, and Society program. She teaches courses on the social dimensions of health and illness as well as courses on the values embedded in technological design and use. Her main research areas are: (1) medical knowledge and clinical practice and (2) aging, science, and technology. Her current research takes up the use of the category autoimmune illness in medicine and examines how people live with these illnesses in daily life.

Professor Joyce previously was an Associate Professor of Sociology at the College of William and Mary. She also served as a Program Director for the Science, Technology, and Society program and the Ethics Education in Science and Engineering program at the National Science Foundation during 2009-2011. She received the Director's Award for Collaborative Integration for contributing to the education of ethical scientists, interagency collaboration, and extraordinary efforts in integrating ethical expertise with scientific knowledge in 2011.




Book Chapters

  • Kelly Joyce. 2011. “On the Assembly Line: Neuroimaging Production in Clinical Practice,” In Sociological Reflections on the Neurosciences, edited by Martyn Pickersgill and Ira Van Keulen, 75-98. Bingley, UK: Emerald Group Publishing Limited.
  • Kelly Joyce. 2010. "The Body as Image: An Examination of the Economic and Political Dynamics of Magnetic Resonance Imaging and the Construction of Difference" in Biomedicalization: Technoscience, Health and Illness in the United States, edited by Adele Clarke, Jennifer Fosket, Laura Mamo, Jennifer Fishman, and Janet Shim, 197-217. Durham, NC: Duke University Press
  • Kelly Joyce and Laura Mamo. 2006. “Graying the Cyborg: New Directions in Feminist Analyses of Aging, Science, and Technology” in Age Matters: Realigning Feminist Thinking, edited by Toni Calasanti and Kathleen Slevin, 99-121. New York: Routledge