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Community-Based Learning Course Archive

Course Formats

  • Service Learning: Courses that have a community component outside of the in-classroom credit hours.
  • Side by Side: Courses which ideally consist of half Drexel students and half community members and aim to co-create learning.
  • Community Hybrid: Courses in which the credit hours are divided between the traditional on-campus classroom and in the community. Modeled after the online hybrid, such courses require structured outside classroom time.
Course Term Format Faculty Community Partners
     
Community Engagement
Students will engage in ethnographic research as a basis for anthropological knowledge. Students will explore cultural perspectives and social processes in relation to building community capacity with a focus on participatory research in learning about evaluation as a cultural system. In addition to classroom lectures and group discussions, students will engage with community residents through our partner program, UConnect, during the course of the term. As a community hybrid course, students will meet M 3:30-4:20 pm in class, and schedule an additional two hour shift with UConnect on T, W or Th 1-3 or 3-5 each week of the term. In order to participate in the course, students have to attend a one-time three hour training on Monday March 28 from either 2:00-5:00 pm, or 5:00-8:00 pm. Thereafter, the course schedule is 3:30-4:20 pm with two additional hours TBA.
Spring, 2016 CBL Hybrid Musket, Jenna UConnect (UConnect helps connect people living in West Philadelphia with necessary social services. Drexel students will be trained to act as navigators to help community residents get access to social service agencies that assist with housing, employment and food assistance).
Housing Politics
Housing is an essential human need, an enduring political issue, and a timely sociotechnical problem that many U.S. cities struggle to address. This Philadelphia-based course engages with local housing issues by taking into account how policy, design, and political economic legacies shape the current landscape. We will learn about the history of U.S. housing, noting how cities developed with regional differences; national policy will be used to frame comparative analysis. Philadelphia and its neighborhoods will serve as our case study. Students will learn how housing developed alongside industry, greenspaces, race, ethnic, and class politics, as well as public health mandates. As a hybrid course, half of our weekly class time will be spent meeting and learning about housing issues from local organizations. Some issues include vacant lot projects, homelessness, zoning, gentrification, healthy homes programs, energy efficiency, and debates over how to address aging housing stock. Course work will include weekly ethnographic journals, and a class research project that translates into community resources.
Spring, 2016 CBL Hybrid Kenner, Alison New Kensington Community Development Corporation and others
History of Philadelphia
This course surveys the history of Philadelphia through pre-colonial, colonial, and industrial eras to the present day. Philadelphia is investigated as an economic, social, cultural, and political center. Students read primary and secondary sources, and conduct original research into Philadelphia's history. Lectures and discussions are complemented by on-site historical investigations.
Spring, 2016 Side by Side Knowles, Scott Gabriel Dornsife Center for Neighborhood Partnerships
Connections in Biology
"This is an open enrollment course which gives students the opportunity to make exactly that: connections. Building upon a new theme in biology each week, students connect that material to their current Philadelphia community as well as to their future professional and personal pursuits. The course is designed on the Community Based Learning platform (CBL) and is scheduled to meet twice a week: one meeting will be a formal class period on campus and one meeting will be at a partnered middle school with the instructor and Drexel students leading a 9 week after school science club. This 3.0 credit course, taught by Monica Togna, PhD, is designated open enrollment and will meet on Mondays and Wednesdays 3:30 – 4:50 p.m. Location TBD. For more information, contact the instructor at mmt73@drexel.edu"
Spring, 2016 Service Learning Togna, Monica Alain Locke Elementary School (grades 3-5) McMichael Elementary School (grades 3-5)
Life is Beautiful
This community partnership course links memoir with life, story-telling, and dying. Specifically, the course partners students with local hospice patients to co-create a life-story for the patient and his or her family. Students learn interviewing, listening, and writing techniques as well as skills in analysis and presentation. Additionally, the course facilitates interactions with the community and helps students to see themselves as linked to a community outside of college.
Spring, 2016 CBL Hybrid Bingham, Ken Crossroads Hospice
Technical Editing
"Editors have a challenging job because their work can invoke in their writers a wide range of feelings: from indifference to resentment. For this reason editors must understand not just the process of correcting and revising the written word, but also the politics and psychology of working with writers and clients. Through studying the current state of the art of editing, examining case studies of professional editorial settings, and serving as practicing editors for local nonprofit organizations, students in this course will explore within the field of editing such topics as: Editorial functions and responsibilities Readers and uses of documents The editor—writer relationship The editor's methods and tools The differences among proofreading, copyediting, and comprehensive editing Legal and ethical issues in editing Objectives: If you successfully complete this course, you will be able to: - describe the pragmatic dimensions of scientific and technical settings within which editors must operate - identify the appropriate editing strategies for specific professional settings, documents, and writers - exercise competence at proofreading, copyediting, and comprehensive editing - describe some of the common ethical and legal concerns that editors must confront"
Spring, 2016 Skills-based service-learning Souder, Lawrence Past partners have included ACHIEVEability, Fairmount Community Development Corporation, Jewish Dialogue Group, The Caring Center, Urban Tree Connection, and UC Green.
Story Medicine
Drexel students will go into the Ryan Seacrest Studio at CHOP to lead CHOP patients in innovative and fun fiction writing exercises. These studio sessions will be broadcast throughout the hospital so that children who can’t come down to the studio can still participate. Drexel students will also write their own flash fiction and will critique each other’s stories. This course aims to introduce Drexel students to introductory storytelling and story-writing techniques. This course also aims to introduce students to the hospital as a vibrant nexus of learning and healing while at the same time utilizing student and patient imagination to create an experiential narrative that can have lasting impact on all involved. Story Medicine takes as its guiding principal that kids are kids first, and that illness is ancillary to the human condition. This is a community-based hybrid and will meet one day at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) and one day on campus.
Spring, 2016 CBL Hybrid Eve, Nomi Children's Hospital of Philadelphia
The Privilege of Aging
The Privilege of Aging is a Hybrid Community-Based Course that is open to Biology students. Aging is often thought of as a negative process, however there are important benefits that are largely uncelebrated. Students in this course will explore the privilege of aging and ways to do it well with senior members of the Philadelphia community. There will be 2 class meetings each week, one on campus and one at a designated senior citizen facility. In addition to the academic underpinnings of the biology of aging, the course will provide the students with intergenerational interactions, as well as opportunities to connect the experience with their academic path at Drexel and their future professional plans.
Spring, 2016 CBL Hybrid Hunte-Brown, Meshagae Dornsife Center for Neighborhood Partnerships
Nonprofit Brand Management
"This course examines how to effectively use public relations and marketing to bring people to and connect people within nonprofit organizations. Through a civic engagement experience at UConnect, students will have an opportunity to actively work with UConnect clients and use that experience to create powerful, values-based language to reach out to a wide audience of community members and supporters. The final project will include documents that will be used by UConnect to promote their work among students, faculty, staff, donors and alumni. Course includes 1 hour of class time and 3 hours of service each week. "
Spring, 2016 Community Hybrid Greenwell, Danie UConnect
Philadelphia Stories
In this CBL course, we will be reading fiction and nonfiction written by contemporary African American authors who have called Philadelphia their home, and whose work addresses issues of cultural identity, education and agency. Students will explore such themes as the legacy of slavery, urban violence, gender issues, and interracial relations as they relate to identity, and will be asked to respond to the readings in both personal and analytical ways, reflecting on the connections between the texts and their own experiences. Format: group discussions; in-class writing; films and other audio-visual materials; writing assignments.
Spring, 2016 Side by Side Ibieta, Gabriella Dornsife Center for Neighborhood Partnerships
Composition and Rhetoric III, Thematic Analysis Across Genres: Create Dangerously
"To create today is to create dangerously. Any publication is an act, and that act exposes one to the passions of an age that forgives nothing.” ― Albert Camus, Resistance, Rebellion and Death: Essays This course will introduce you to a fascinating land: Haiti. We will be reading short stories written by Haitian authors and learning various fictional techniques to aid us in discussing the works. The theme for this course is “Create Dangerously,” (a term first used by the existential philosopher, Albert Camus) refers to the situation in which many writers in exile or international writers find themselves when subject to despotic governments. One question we will ask ourselves is, does the act of writing itself require all writers to take personal risks? We will also read Shakespeare’s The Tempest, which will be interesting in light of Haiti’s colonial history and comparing it to A Tempest, which is a post colonial version of Shakespeare’s original text. We will assume a writerly approach, which takes into consideration the various fictive techniques and genres and sources that aid a writer in producing text, including political, historical, cultural, social and personal events."
Spring, 2016 Side by Side Millan, Harriet Haitan-American Association
Mobilizing the Scientific Method
This course utilizes the Inside-Out Prison Exchange Program to explore the relationship between individuals and the prison system. The Inside-Out Exchange Program is an evolving set of projects that creates opportunities for dialogue between those on the outside and those on the inside of the nation’s correctional facilities. The program demonstrates the potential for dynamic collaborations between institutions of higher education and correctional institutions. Most importantly, through this unique exchange, Inside-Out and this course seeks to deepen the conversation- and transform ways of thinking about crime and justice (Crabbe, Pompa, 2004) Course Goal and Mission: At the most basic level, this course and program allows students to go behind the walls to reconsider what they have learned about crime and justice, while those on the inside are encouraged to place their life experiences in a larger framework. Students will exchange ideas and perceptions about crime and justice, the criminal justice system, corrections and imprisonment. It is a chance for all participants to gain a deeper understanding of the criminal justice system through the marriage of theoretical knowledge and practical experience achieved by weekly meetings and extended throughout the semester. (Crabbe, Pompa, 2004)."
Spring, 2016 Side by Side Rickards, Cynthia Curran-Fromhold Correctional Facility
Justice in Our Community
This course is a seminar style community-based learning course that will begin with an introduction to urban sociology and examine problems unique to cities. The majority of our instructional time will take place with our community partners. The synthesis of scholarship and community classroom experience will provide a holistic leans in which to explore issues in our urban community. Topics include, urban economies, access to education and health care, digital divides and crime.
Winter, 2016 CBL Hybrid Rickards, Cynthia Dornsife Center for Neighborhood Partnerships
Once Upon a Lifetime (So Far)
The focus of this course will be to stimulate conversation, writing, and the exchange of both among the Drexel students and inside-students. All students will have a course packet of readings that acts as a companion and teaching tool to their writing. They will engage in writing as a process; as a way to facilitate this vital conversation. They will also keep a weekly journal.
Winter, 2016 CBL Hybrid Hirsch, Cassandra Curran-Fromhold Correctional Facility
Critical Reasoning
This Side by Side course introduces and develops the skills involved in reasoning effectively about human experience.
Winter, 2016 Side by Side Ake, Stacey Dornsife Center for Neighborhood Partnerships
Prison, Society, and You
This course utilizes the Inside-Out Prison Exchange Program to explore the relationship between individuals and the prison system. The Inside-Out Exchange Program is an evolving set of projects that creates opportunities for dialogue between those on the outside and those on the inside of the nation’s correctional facilities. The program demonstrates the potential for dynamic collaborations between institutions of higher education and correctional institutions. Most importantly, through this unique exchange, Inside-Out an this course seeks to deepen the conversation and transform ways of thinking about crime and justice (Crabbe, Pompa, 2004).
Fall, 2015 Side by Side Rickards, Cynthia Curran-Fromhold Correctional Facility
Creative Non-Fiction Writing
Many people are scared of death. However, the last days of someone’s life are really a time to celebrate that life. In this hybrid, community-based learning course, student pairs will join together to create a video documentary and Life Journal book to help a hospice patient pass down their life experiences to their family and loved ones. You'll let them know what they've done really matters. Along the way, you'll learn how much you matter as well as every single passing day of your life.
Fall, 2015 Side by Side Wenrick, Rachel Patient's Homes
Hospice Journaling
Many people are scared of death. However, the last days of someone’s life are really a time to celebrate that life. In this hybrid, community-based learning course, student pairs will join together to create a video documentary and Life Journal book to help a hospice patient pass down their life experiences to their family and loved ones. You'll let them know what they've done really matters. Along the way, you'll learn how much you matter as well as every single passing day of your life.
Summer, 2015 CBL Hybrid Bingham, Kenneth Patient's Homes
Literature and Society: War Stories - Violence and Resilience
War Stories: Violence and Resilience is a side-by-side community based course in which students explore war from the ground-level point of view of soldiers in combat. The focus will be non-fiction accounts of soldiers in battle. The class treats war stories as a form of literature that depicts the human struggle to survive and make meaning in extreme situations. Some course texts will be graphic, and there will be no attempt to minimize the violence and bloodshed that defines war. The class will also explore the aftermath of war and the challenges faced by veterans re-entering civilian society.
Summer, 2015 Side by Side Watts, Robert Dornsife Center for Neighborhood Partnerships
Prison, Society, and You
This course utilizes the Inside-Out Prison Exchange Program to explore the relationship between individuals and the prison system. The Inside-Out Exchange Program is an evolving set of projects that creates opportunities for dialogue between those on the outside and those on the inside of the nation’s correctional facilities. The program demonstrates the potential for dynamic collaborations between institutions of higher education and correctional institutions. Most importantly, through this unique exchange, Inside-Out and this course seeks to deepen the conversation and transform ways of thinking about crime and justice (Crabbe, Pompa, 2004).
Spring, 2015 Side by Side Rickards, Cynthia Curran-Fromhold Correctional Facility
Philadelphia Stories
In this course, we will be reading selections from fictional and nonfictional texts written by African American authors who have called Philadelphia their home, and whose work addresses issues of cultural identity and agency. We will explore such themes as the legacy of slavery, urban violence, gender issues, and interracial relations. Some of the authors we’ll study are: Elijah Anderson, MK Asante, Lorene Carey, Ayana Matthis, Sonia Sanchez and John Edgar Wideman. Students will be asked to respond to the readings both in an analytical and a personal way, reflecting on the connections between the texts and their own experiences.
Spring, 2015 Side by Side Ibieta, Gabriella Dornsife Center for Neighborhood Partnerships
Techniques of Speaking
A workshop course in improving public speaking skills. Provides experience in speeches of explanation, persuasion, and argument. This course examines types of civic dialogue in an immersive learning environment. Students will create presentations around issues of social justice that are important to them and practice publically delivering those messages in front of a live audience. Types of speaking will include speeches, public debates, town hall or city council meetings. Homework will include attending a neighborhood meeting or other public presentation. Students will also learn how to identify the various methods speakers use to influence audiences.
Spring, 2015 Side by Side Greenwell, Danie Dornsife Center for Neighborhood Partnerships
History of Philadelphia
As the twentieth century recedes further into memory, our sense of the past and our methods of exploring it are further evolving. This course will invite students to consider the distant and recent past of the City of Philadelphia, with particular emphasis on West Philadelphia, the Black Bottom, and the African-American diaspora. Further, students will be exposed to contemporary trends in public history and art as “social practice,” in particular, interdisciplinary efforts to commemorate the individuals and spaces that define the twentieth century US urban experience. Students will develop the skills necessary to plan and conduct archival research; interpret primary and secondary historical sources; conduct oral histories; and experiment with available models in the emerging field of digital humanities. Students will further be asked to consider ways in which historical material, and content of immediate local relevance, can be shared with a broad, non-professional audience, and the role residents play in authoring their own history.
Spring, 2015 Side by Side Grossi, Patrick Dornsife Center for Neighborhood Partnerships
Connections in Biology
This is an open enrollment course that gives students the opportunity to make exactly that: connections. Building upon a new theme in biology each week, students connect that material to their current Philadelphia community as well as to their future professional and personal pursuits. The course is designed on the Community Based Learning platform (CBL) and is scheduled to meet twice a week: one meeting will be a formal class period on campus and one meeting will be at a partnered middle school with the instructor and Drexel students leading a 9 week after school science club.
Spring, 2015 CBL Hybrid Togna, Monica Alain Locke Elementary
Rhetoric of Civil Discourse
This course draws from the ancient accounts of rhetoric and the contemporary studies on rhetoric to rehabilitate it as a way to inform our efforts towards a more civil public discourse. This course also will host guest speakers from local civic and political organizations who engage in rhetorical practices in the service of civic engagement, which includes the discourse both of people who exercise political power and of citizens who debate over public policies and cultural identity.
Winter, 2015 Service Learning Souder, Lawrence Local non-profit organizations
Justice in Our Community
This course is a seminar style community-based learning course that will begin with an introduction to urban sociology and examine problems unique to cities. The majority of our instructional time will take place with our community partners at LIFT. The synthesis of scholarship and community classroom experience will provide a holistic lens in which to explore issues in our urban community. Topics include urban economies, access to education and health care, digital divides and crime.
Winter, 2015 CBL Hybrid Rickards, Cynthia LIFT-Philadelphia
History of Philadelphia
Students will develop the skills necessary to plan and conduct archival research; interpret primary and secondary historical sources; conduct oral histories; and experiement with available models in the emerging field of digital humanities. Students will further be asked to consider ways in which historical material, and content of immediate locale relevance, can be shared with a broad, non-professional audience, and the role residents play in authoring their own history.
Winter, 2015 Side by Side Grossi, Patrick Dornsife Center for Neighborhood Partnerships
Once Upon a Lifetime (So Far)
In this memoir-writing course, built on the Inside-Out Prison Exchange Program's teaching model, 15 Drexel students and 15 individuals incarcerated at the Curran Fromhold Correctional Facility will meet once weekly to discuss various published memoirs and lean the craft of writing memoir. In the process, they will learn about themselves and their peers. Prior to, and during the course, students will be encouraged to put aside their preconceptions of the "other".
Winter, 2015 CBL Hybrid Hirsch, Cassandra Curran_Fromhold Correctional Facility
Re-examining Our Code: An Ethnography of 33rd Street
This course utilizes Side-by-Side Community-Based Learning format to explore the relationship between Drexel students and community students. The CBL format is an evolving set of projects that will create opportunities for dialogue between Drexel, Mantua and Powelton Village community members. The course demonstrates the potential for dymanimc collaborations between students and members in the community. Elijah Anderson's Code of the Street: Decency, Violence, and the Moral Life of the Inner City, will be utilized as an example of urban ethnography. Students will learn, review, and evaluate ethnographic methods. The course will begin an ethnographic study of 33rd Street through Mantua, Powelton Village and conclude on Drexel's campus.
Fall, 2014 Side by Side Rickards, Cynthia
Dornsife Center for Neighborhood Partnerships
Project Footpath
This course is a multidisciplinary introduction to scientific communication through a community -based learning platform focused around urban ecology. The goals of this course are to develop an understanding of urban ecology, civil planning, public outreach about science, graphic designs, asnd social media technology. Over the term, students will plan, design, and potentially implement an informational and engaging walking pathway to connect Drexel's Main Campus with Center City Campus incuding a segment along the Schuykill Banks.
Fall, 2014 CBL Hybrid Daeschler, Edward B.
City of Philadelphia
Nonprofit Communication
All nonprofit organizations must develop and maintain effective communication strategies in order to survive in a competitive economy. Nonprofits have unique needs and limitations in their long-term goals and short-term operations that relate to communication. This course introducese students to the ways nonprofit communicate with both their constituents and theier benefactors and the ways researchers have examined these practices. Students will explore these two pespectives on nonprofit communication through a combination of scholarly readings, dialogues with local representatives in the nonprofit sector, and direct contact and work for a local nonprofit organizations (as coordinated by Drexel Edits, a center for the support of nonprofit communication). This course articulates with the content and goalsx of other courses in the Department of Culture and Communication, specifically COM  280 (Public Relations), COM 220 (Qualitative Research Methods), COM 282 (Public Relations Writing), COM 286 (Public Relations Strategies and Tactics), COM  675 (Grant Writing for the Arts and Humanities), and COM 680 (Public Relations Writing and Strategies).
Fall, 2014 Service Learning Souder, Lawrence
Urban Tree Connection; The Vetarans Group; Moder Patshala; West Philadelphia Financial Services; Project for Nuclear Awareness; U.C. Green, Inc.; Spell Writing Lab, Inc.; Ivan "Pick" Brown Memorial; ACHIEVEability; Art Sanctuary; Lancaster Avenue 21st Century Business Association; Usiloquy Dance Designs; Childrens Hospital of Philadelphia
Gleaning, Food Security and Agriculture
Gleaning is "the act of collecting leftover crops from farmers' fields after they have been commercially harvested or on fields where it is not economically profitable to harvest" (Wikipedia). Students in this course will experience gleaning in the field, as well in films, novels, television shows and historical studies. In addition to the hands-on experience in the fields, the course will focus on gleaning in other ways. We will study and discuss agriculture, food security, and gleaning from a variety of critical perspectives, while examining the cultural context of the works we read.
Fall, 2014 Side by Side Thury, Eva Marie
Philabundance
Constitutional Controversies
The First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution protects rights to speech, religious expression, and free associates, but what are --and should be--the limits of those protections? This class, which meets off-campus with students incarcerated at the Curran-Fromhold Correctional Facility as part of Drexel's Inside-Out Prison Exchange Program, will use Supreme Court cases to explore enduring tensions over individual freedom and the public interest. Permission of the instructor required; free transportation provided.
Fall, 2014 Side by Side Corrigan, Rose
Inside-Out/Curran-Fromhold Correctional Facility
Urban Farming Communities
This class will explore urban farming from a community organizing perspective. Class will take place on an urban farm in West Philadelphia, where students will learn practical skills for planting and maintaining an urban green space as well as organizing communities and planning crop distribution. Students will be in class for 1.5 hours every week and are expected to volunteer on an urban farm for three hours per week.
Summer, 2014 CBL Hybrid Greenwell, Danie
Enterprise Center, 46th and Market
Hospice Journaling
Many people are scared of death. However, the last days of someone’s life are really a time to celebrate that life. In this hybrid, community-based learning course, student pairs will join together to create a video documentary and Life Journal book to help a hospice patient pass down their life experiences to their family and loved ones. You'll let them know that what they've done really mattered. Students travel and meet with hospice patients within residential homes or an inpatient hospice program.
Summer, 2014 CBL Hybrid Bingham, Kenneth
Crossroads Hospice/Patient's Homes
Rhetoric of Style
Both rhetoric and style are often contrasted with substance, especially in the contexts of politics, public relations, and advertising.  Such was not always the case, however. The venerable tradition of rhetoric, which goes back to the ancient Greeks, includes not only the use of style as embellishment but also the acknowledgment of important parallels between style and substance. According to many ancient and contemporary rhetoricians, styles of speech can both reflect and inform styles of thought. This course will try to rehabilitate our commonly misunderstood notions of style by examining the relationship between figures of speech and figures of thought.  In this community-based learning course, students will consult with area non-profits for assessing  and possibly improving the writing style of their documents.  This course articulates with the content and goals of other courses in the Department of Culture and Communication, including COM 270 (Business Communication), COM 570 (Technical Editing), and COM 680 (PR Writing & Strategies).
Spring, 2014 Service Learning Souder, Lawrence
Local nonprofit orgs    
Promoting Health and Wellbeing
This course will explore health promotion campaigns: what the messages are, who they are aimed at and whether or not they work. By the end of this class, students will create their own health message aimed at a variety of target audiences. So whether they are a communication major, a graphic designer or just want to learn more about health promotion, this class will be an informative, exploratory experience.   Part of the Side by Side model at Drexel, this class will take place off-campus with members of the West Philadelphia community. Students will learn alongside members of LIFT - an organization that works to combat poverty by bridging the technical divide. (This is not volunteer work, though students  are welcome to volunteer at LIFT at any time.) Together, they will create a meaningful group project and share it to the broader community whether digitally or at a health fair.
Spring, 2014 Side by Side Greenwell, Danie
LIFT- Philadelphia
Prison, Society, and You
This course utilizes the Inside-Out Prison Exchange Program to explore the relationship between individuals and the prison system. The Inside-Out Exchange Program is an evolving set of projects that creates opportunities for dialogue between those on the outside and those on the inside of the nation’s correctional facilities. The program demonstrates the potential for dynamic collaborations between institutions of higher education and correctional institutions. Most importantly, through this unique exchange, Inside-Out an this course seeks to deepen the conversation- and transform ways of thinking about crime and justice.
Spring, 2014 Side by Side Brooks, Cheri
Curran-Fromhold Correctional Facility
Doing Justice -Digital Storytelling
This new course offers students a chance to learn about social justice efforts in Philadelphia along with digital design and apply their skills to serve local justice-promoting nonprofits. By creating several very short field dispatches or video documentaries, students can demonstrate their understanding of power, privilege, and social justice and communicate their sensitivity using cutting-edge multimedia techniques. Near the end of the course, several invited community development partners, scholars, and filmmakers will provide students with the extraordinary opportunity for project feedback on the short documentaries to raise their ethical and cultural awareness. Students don't need prior technology or women's studies coursework experience to succeed in this course. Students will earn the technology in class.  Ultimately, the community partners will have something they may choose to use on their websites. Students will walk away with several samples (tangible evidence) of their communication, creative, critical thinking and ethical reasoning skills to share with friends, family, and potential employers.
Spring, 2014 CBL Hybrid Bitzer, Carolyn
Local nonprofit orgs
Connections in Biology
This course is a new open enrollment special topics course which will give students the opportunity to make exactly that: connections. Building upon a new theme in biology each week, students will connect that material to their current Philadelphia community as well as to their future professional and personal pursuits. The course is designed on the Community Based Learning platform (CBL) and is scheduled to meet twice a week: one meeting will be a formal lecture on campus and one meeting will be at a partnered middle school with the instructor and Drexel students leading an 8 week after school science club. Course assignments would focus on taking a particular concept or skill learned in one of our Drexel courses, connecting it to the lesson demonstrated at the middle school that week, researching real world applications of that technique, and identifying careers which would utilize that technique or concept. Concepts can range from DNA extraction using common over-the counter supplies to microbiology to biodiversity and genetics. Students will gain volunteer hours, get an introduction to civic engagement, benefit from community based learning practices and connect their Drexel course material to the bigger picture in their lives.
Spring, 2014 CBL Hybrid Togna, Monica
Lock Elementary School
The American Dream
The course utilizes the Inside-Out Prison Exchange Program to explore inequality in the United States as it relates to the American Dream. It will be held at the Curran Fromhold Correctional Facility on State Road (transportation provided). The Inside-Out Exchange Program creates opportunities for dialogue between those on the outside and those on the inside of the nation’s prisons and correctional facilities. Through this unique exchange, Inside-Out and this course seek to deepen the conversation- and transform ways of thinking about life trajectories in the U.S.
Winter, 2014 Side by Side Porpora, Douglas
Curran-Fromhold Correctional Facility
Rhetoric of Civil Discourse
This course draws from the ancient accounts of rhetoric and the contemporary studies on rhetoric to rehabilitate it as a way to inform our efforts towards a more civil public discourse. This course also will host guest speakers from local civic and political organizations who engage in rhetorical practices in the service of civic engagement, which includes the discourse both of people who exercise political power and of citizens who debate over public policies and cultural identity.
Winter, 2014 Traditional Souder, Lawrence
Local nonprofit orgs
Justice in our Community
This course is a seminar style community-based learning course that will begin with an introduction to urban sociology and examine problems unique to cities. The majority of our instructional time will take place with our community partners at LIFT. The synthesis of scholarship and community classroom experience will provide a holistic lens in which to explore issues in our urban community.  Topics include urban economies, access to education and health care, digital divides and crime.  
Winter, 2014 CBL Hybrid Rickards, Cynthia
LIFT-Philadelphia
Second. Ed. Math Enrichment
As a community based learning course, students will spend half of the class time working with students in a partnering middle/high school teaching these same topics in small groups.  
Fall, 2013 CBL Hybrid Papadopoulos, Dimitrios
Frier Charter School
Once Upon a Lifetime
This is a writing-intensive course in which students create memoirs with senior partners in our community.  What parts of your life would you like to capture and share in a space that encourages you to recall important moments, days, and weeks? Each student, young and old, will engage in telling their story of a lifetime so far, reading from a course packet of memoir and creating memoir of their own. This class will be built on individual and collaborative efforts among the students. It will culminate, after ten weeks, in a student-written anthology of life stories and a closing ceremony. The structure of the class promotes civic engagement with senior citizens who - able to communicate and engage - reside within walking distance of Drexel's University City campus. Note that this is not a community service or a charity project; it is a class built upon the idea that these two generations have much to learn from sharing and writing about their lives, and that their preconceptions about each other can be left at the door.
Fall, 2013 CBL Hybrid Hirsch, Cassandra
Mantua Senior Residents
Nonprofit Communication
All nonprofit organizations must develop and maintain effective communication strategies in order to survive in a competitive economy. Nonprofits have unique needs and limitations in their long-term goals and short-term operations that relate to communication. This course introduces students to the ways nonprofits communicate with both their constituents and their benefactors and the ways researchers have examined these practices. Students will explore these two perspectives on nonprofit communication through a combination of scholarly readings, dialogues with local representatives in the nonprofit sector, and direct contact and work for a local nonprofit organization (as coordinated by the Drexel Center for the Support of Nonprofit Communication).
Fall, 2013 Service Learning Souder, Lawrence
local nonprofit orgs  through the Lindy Center, including so far Achievability and the Spells Writing Lab
Culture of Poverty
Philadelphia has the highest poverty rate of the nation’s 10 largest cities—approximately 28% of its citizens live below the federal poverty line. This course examines, analyzes, re-visits and engages with the historically contested concept, “culture of poverty.” Through weekly seminars, reading, discussion, debate and a civic engagement service-learning experience at a local community-based organization (LIFT), students will have an opportunity to examine poverty at macro and micro levels in deeply personal ways. This course will address themes such as: theories of volunteerism and service-learning; global and local poverty; myths and realities of poverty; historical perspectives of urban poverty; poverty and neoliberal governance; macroforces that shape poverty; the individual, culture and society; poverty and age, gender, race and ethnicity; and new directions in examining inequality and poverty in 21st century communities.
Fall, 2013 CBL Hybrid Musket, Marilyn
LIFT - Philadelphia
Healthy Green Spaces
This course will explore community organizing as it relates to urban farming and community gardens. Learn how to effectively communicate with neighbors and local governments to create healthy green spaces and spend time at a farm in West Philadelphia. Students will learn alongside residents of West Philadelphia who are building healthy green spaces from empty lots.
Summer, 2013 Side by Side Greenwell, Danielle
Enterprise Center 46th and Market
 
A Beautiful Life
Many people are scared of death. However, the last days of someone’s life are really a time to celebrate that life. In this hybrid, community-based learning course, student pairs will join together to create a video documentary and Life Journal book to help a hospice patient pass down their life experiences to their family and loved ones. Participants will show the patients that what they’ve done really matters, while learning how much their own lives matter as well. Student will be required to meet with their hospice partner in area hospice or home once per week for interview material.
Summer, 2013 CBL Hybrid Bingham, Kenneth
Patients' Homes
The American Dream
The course utilizes the Inside-Out Prison Exchange Program to explore inequality in the United States as it relates to the American Dream. It will be held at the Curran Fromhold Correctional Facility on State Road (transportation provided). The Inside-Out Exchange Program is an creates opportunities for dialogue between those on the outside and those on the inside of the nation’s prisons and correctional facilities. Through this unique exchange, Inside-Out and this course seek to deepen the conversation- and transform ways of thinking about life trajectories in the U.S.
Spring, 2013 Side by Side Porpora, Douglas
Curran-Fromhold Correctional Facility
Talking the Walk
Promoting Social Justice through Public Speaking and Civic Dialogue: This course examines types of civic dialogue in an immersive learning environment. Students will create presentations around issues of social justice that are important to them and practice publically delivering those messages in front of a live audience. Types of speaking will include mock election speeches, public debates, town hall or city council meetings.  Homework will include attending a neighborhood meeting or other public presentation. Students will also learn how to identify the various methods speakers use to influence audiences.  Side-by Side Model
Winter, 2013 Side by Side Greenwell, Danielle
LIFT-Philadelphia
Urban Life
This course utilizes the Inside-Out Exchange Model to explore the relationship between individuals and the city. This program is an evolving set of course experiences that creates opportunities for dialogue between LIFT clients and traditional Drexel students. The program demonstrates the potential for dynamic collaborations between students who may not have otherwise had an opportunity to learn together. Most importantly, through this unique exchange, this course seeks to deepen the conversation- and transform ways of thinking about our experience of the city, civic engagement, social class and urban policy.  Through the civic engagement experience with LIFT, students will have an opportunity to examine larger, macro, social structures and investigate an individual relationship with our partners in the community this term. We will utilize the Harkness Discussion learning pedagogy to enhance the course experience. Students will use assigned discussion roles and guidelines to process the course readings, materials experience.
Fall, 2012 Side by Side Rickards, Cynthia
LIFT -Philadelphia
Prison, Society, and You
This course utilizes the Inside-Out Prison Exchange Program to explore the relationship between individuals and the prison system. The Inside-Out Exchange Program is an evolving set of projects that creates opportunities for dialogue between those on the outside and those on the inside of the nation’s correctional facilities. The program demonstrates the potential for dynamic collaborations between institutions of higher education and correctional institutions. Most importantly, through this unique exchange, Inside-Out an this course seeks to deepen the conversation- and transform ways of thinking about crime and justice
Spring, 2012 Side by Side Rickards, Cynthia
Curran-Fromhold Correctional Facility
Community Organizing
This course examines how to effectively use communication to organize groups of people towards a similar goal or cause. Though a civic engagement experience at LIFT, you will have the opportunity to actively work with LIFT clients and use that experience to create a meaningful message to promote LIFTs values to a wide audience of community members and supporters. The final project will include creating and implementing a small educational event or campaign. Service Learning Model
Spring, 2012 CBL Hybrid Greenwell, Danielle
LIFT- Philadelphia
Com in Grass Roots Orgns
 This course examines how to effectively use differing media to bring people to and connect people within grassroots organizations. Through a civic engagement experience at LIFT, students will have an opportunity to actively work with LIFT clients and use that experience to create powerful, values-based language to reach out to a wide audience of community members and supporters. Class meets at Drexel one hour per week and students are required to schedule time at LIFT for three hours per week. The final project will include creating (and possibly implementing) a fundraising event or campaign.  Through this course, students will learn basics of non-profit communication, how to generate meaningful materials for volunteer and supporter recruiting, and about communication across cultures. Service Learning Model
Winter, 2012 CBL Hybrid Greenwell, Danielle
LIFT- Philadelphia
Culture of Poverty
This course examines and analyzes the concept of a culture of poverty. Through the civic engagement service experience at LIFT students will have an opportunity to examine larger, macro, social structures and investigate an individual relationship with our partners in the community this term. We will utilize the Harkness Discussion learning pedagogy to enhance the course experience. Students will use assigned discussion roles and guidelines to process the course readings, materials and field experience. We will meet in class for one meeting (1 hour) and you will be in the field participating in service (3 hours per week) in place of a second on campus class meeting time. You are required to participate in a volunteer training session on October 1st.
Fall, 2011 CBL Hybrid Rickards, Cynthia
LIFT- Philadelphia
Service Learning in Sociology
This course introduces students to the scientific approach to the study of society, including the study of social structures; students will study such topics as how we acquires self-identity, gender, our behavior in groups , bureaucracies, stereotyping , the role of the state, survey research , culture and collective behavior, poverty and education. Issues of race, class and gender within larger social structures will be given particular attention to through the course. Through the community service experience at LIFT, students will have an opportunity to examine larger, macro, social structures and investigate an individual relationship with our partners in the community this term. We will utilize traditional learning pedagogies and on-line technologies to enhance the course experience and allow for individual learning styles and creativity.
Fall, 2010 CBL Hybrid Rickards, Cynthia
LIFT- Philadelphia