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New Spring Courses

January 05, 2016

Students will lead fiction-writing exercises with patients at CHOP, discover the therapeutic potential of philosophy, and learn about the millions of species of insects that co-inhabit our planet — for better or worse — in these spring courses!

Biodiversity, Earth & Environmental Science

ST: Sustainable Transportation (ENSS T380.001)
For the past six decades, conventional transportation planning and engineering have created automobile-dependent communities, directly contributing to costly traffic congestion, America’s obesity epidemic, and global climate change. Sustainable transportation in the 21st century seeks to create communities where people have greater mobility options by balancing car culture with safe and convenient pedestrian, bicycle and mass-transit systems. This course will provide an introduction into how leading communities are planning and developing these sustainable forms of transportation.

This 3.0 credit special-topic course, taught by BEES staff, will meet on Thursdays, 6:30 – 9:20 p.m. Location TBD.

ST: Bugs Among Us: Insects and Human Society (ENVS T280.001)
We revile them, we marvel at them — insects impact our lives in a myriad of ways. They have shaped human history; they cost us billions of dollars to control their damage to our crops, homes and health; they provide important products such as silk and honey; are used in assessment tools; are inspiration for the latest engineering designs; and provide vital ecological services such as pollination and decomposition. Whether we like it or not, insects comprise more than a million species co-inhabiting this Earth with us. This course will explore these aspects of insects, and many others. Students will use this exploration of insects as exposure to scientific concepts such as biodiversity, evolution, ecology, behavior, morphology and physiology. In addition, students will examine how insects have made their way in human culture, from ancient and traditional art to modern day film.

This 3.0 credit course, taught by Jon Gelhaus, PhD, will meet on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays, 10 – 10:50 a.m. Location TBD.

ST: Intro to Oceanography (GEO T280.001)
This course offers a topics-based approach to the field of oceanography and its disciplines, providing students with a solid understanding of the field, and a foundation to pursue further advanced topics in oceanography, or to learn about how our planet works.

This 3.0 credit course, taught by BEES staff, will meet on Tuesdays and Thursdays, 9:30 – 10:50 a.m. Location TBD.

Community-Based Learning

*More spring community-based learning courses to be announced!

BIOLOGY

The Privilege of Aging
Hybrid Course
Community Partner: TBD

Aging is often thought of as a negative process; however, there are important benefits that are largely uncelebrated. Students in this course will explore the privilege of aging and ways to do it well with senior members of the Philadelphia community. There will be two class meetings each week, one on campus and one at a designated senior citizen facility. In addition to the academic underpinnings of the biology of aging, the course will provide students with intergenerational interactions, as well as opportunities to connect the experience with their academic path at Drexel and their future professional plans.

This community-based learning course is taught by Meshagae Hunte-Brown, PhD, and is open to current biology students. Meeting time and location TBD.

Connections in Biology (BIO 200.001)
Hybrid Course
Community Partner: Locke Elementary School

Building upon a new theme in biology each week, students will connect the material they learn in class to the Philadelphia community, as well as to their future professional and personal pursuits. The course is scheduled to meet twice a week: one meeting will be a formal lecture on campus and one meeting will be at a partnered middle school, leading an eight-week after-school science club. Course assignments will focus on taking a particular concept or skill learned in one of our Drexel courses, connecting it to the lesson demonstrated at the middle school that week, researching real-world applications of that technique, and identifying careers that would utilize that technique or concept. Concepts can range from DNA extraction using common over-the counter supplies, to microbiology to biodiversity and genetics.

This community-based learning course, taught by Monica Togna, PhD, will meet Mondays and Wednesdays, 3:30 – 4:50 p.m. Location TBD.

COMMUNICATION

Technical Editing (COM 570/420)
Service Learning
Community Partner: TBD

Editors have a challenging job because their work can invoke in their writers a wide range of feelings: from indifference to resentment. For this reason, editors must understand not just the process of correcting and revising the written word, but also the politics and psychology of working with writers and clients. Through studying the current state of the art of editing, examining case studies of professional editorial settings, and conversing directly with practicing editors, students in this course will explore within the field of editing such topics as: editorial functions and responsibilities, readers and uses of documents, the editor-writer relationship, the editor's methods and tools; the differences among proofreading, copyediting, and comprehensive editing; and legal and ethical issues in editing. Each student in this course will acquire real-world experience in editing by partnering with a nonprofit organization.

This community-based learning course is taught by Lawrence Souder, PhD. Meeting time and location TBD.

CRIMINOLOGY & JUSTIC STUDIES

Justice in Our Community (CJS 260)
Hybrid Course
Community Partner: UConnect

This course is a seminar-style community-based learning course that begins with an introduction to urban social issues and examines problems unique to cities. The majority of students’ instructional time will take place with community partners. The synthesis of scholarship and community-classroom experience will provide a holistic lens in which to explore issues in our urban community. Topics will include urban economies, access to education and health care, digital divides and crime. 

This community-based learning course is taught by Cyndi Rickards, EdD. Meeting time and location TBD.

Prison, Society and You
Side-by-Side Course
Community Partner: Curran-Fromhold Correctional Facility

This course utilizes the Inside-Out Prison Exchange program to explore the relationship between individuals and the prison system. The Inside-Out Exchange program is an evolving set of projects that creates opportunities for dialogue between those on the outside and those on the inside of the nation’s correctional facilities. The program demonstrates the potential for dynamic collaborations between institutions of higher education and correctional institutions. Most importantly, through this unique exchange, this course seeks to deepen the conversation and transform ways of thinking about crime and justice.

This community-based learning course is taught by Cyndi Rickards, EdD. Meeting time and location TBD.

ENGLISH

Story Medicine (ENG 103)
Hybrid Course
Community Partner: CHOP

Drexel students will go into the Ryan Seacrest Studio at CHOP to lead patients in innovative and fun fiction writing exercises. These studio sessions will be broadcast throughout the hospital so that children who can’t come to the studio can still participate. Drexel students will also write their own flash fiction and will critique each other’s stories. This course aims to introduce Drexel students to storytelling and story-writing techniques. The course also aims to introduce students to the hospital as a vibrant nexus of learning and healing, while at the same time, utilizing student and patient imagination to create an experiential narrative that can have lasting impact on all involved. Story Medicine takes as its guiding principal that kids are kids first, and that illness is ancillary to the human condition.

This is a community-based learning course will meet one day at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) and one day on campus. Exact times and campus location TBD.

POLITICAL SCIENCE

ST: Housing Politics (PSCI T280.001 / HIST T280.004)
Hybrid Course
Community Partner: TBD

Housing is an essential human need, an enduring political issue, and a timely sociotechnical problem that many U.S. cities struggle to address. This Philadelphia-based course engages with local housing issues by taking into account how policy, design, and political economic legacies shape the current landscape. As a community-based hybrid course, at least half of our weekly class time will be spent in the field investigating both citywide and neighborhood-based housing issues, in partnership with a local organization.

This 4.0 credit course, taught by Ali Kenner, PhD is open to all students and will meet Mondays and Wednesdays, 4 – 6 p.m. Location TBD.

WRITING

Hospice Journaling
Hybrid Course
Community Partner: Crossroads Hospice

This community partnership course links memoir with life, story telling and dying. Specifically, the course partners students with local hospice patients to co-create a life-story for the patient and his or her family. Students learn interviewing, listening and writing techniques as well as skills in analysis and presentation. Additionally, the course facilitates interactions with the community and helps students to see themselves as linked to a community outside of college.

This community-based learning course is taught by Kenneth Bingham. Meeting time and location TBD.

Environmental Policy

International Climate Finance (ENVP 550.001)
After years of failing to produce significant sums to address climate change at the international level, recent agreements suggest that hundreds of billions of dollars — and perhaps more than a trillion — will be made available to address the issue in the coming years. How should this money be spent? What institutions have the authority to determine its distribution? How do they work? Who controls them? This course introduces students to the global governance architecture related to climate finance. Students will begin by examining the relationship between climate change and economic development and the diverse interests of developed and developing states.

This 3.0 credit course, taught by Erin Graham, PhD, is open to all graduate students and upper-level undergraduate students with adviser and department approval. It meets Wednesdays, 6 – 8:50 p.m. Location TBD.

Environmental Justice (ENVP 875.001)
This is a seminar course that will focus on the concept of environmental justice/injustice; empirical evidence of inequalities; theories of environmental injustice; politics of environmental health and illness; legal remedies at local and international level; and the environmental justice movement.

This 3.0 credit course, taught by Diane Sicotte, PhD, is open to all graduate students and upper-level undergraduate students with adviser and department approval. It meets Thursdays, 6:30 – 9:20 p.m. Location TBD.

ST: Institutional and Cultural Dynamics of Climate Change (ENVP T880.001)
This course covers topics of current interests to faculty and students; specific topics for each term will be announced prior to registration. May be repeated for credit if topics vary.

This 3.0 credit course, taught by Robert Brulle, PhD, is open to all graduate students and upper-level undergraduate students with adviser and department approval. It meets Tuesdays, 6:30 – 9:30 p.m. Location TBD.

History

ST: History of Biomedicine (HIST T280.001)
This course will survey the intellectual and social-cultural history of Western medicine from the 18th century to the present. It will focus on the political, economic, institutional and cultural aspects of the development of scientific medicine. Interpretive materials will include biographies, medical publications, films and fictional accounts related to topics including the role of physicians, nurses, hospitals, biomedical research, therapies etc.

This 3.0 credit course, taught by Lloyd Ackert, PhD, is open to all students and will meet on Tuesdays and Thursdays, 2 – 3:20 p.m. Location TBD.

ST: Inequality (HIST T280.002)
This introductory lecture course teaches students how to study the history of economic change on a global scale. It places a special emphasis on the processes and dynamics that reinforce and create inequality between different groups and populations.

This 3.0 credit course, taught by Alden Young, PhD, is open to all students and will meet on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays, 12 – 12:50 p.m. Location TBD.

ST: Wealth in Modern Africa (HIST T280.003)
This course focuses on 20th century efforts at economic development in Africa. It draws on the voices of African politicians, intellectuals, businessmen and activists, as well as the international social science literature from that period to the present.

This 3.0 credit course, taught by Alden Young, PhD is open to all students and will meet on Mondays, Wednesday, and Fridays, 10 – 10:50 a.m. Location TBD.

Philosophy

ST: Philosophy of Mind (PHIL T280.001)
Students will first examine the main philosophical theories, both historical and contemporary, concerning the relationship of mind and body. They will then discuss issues surrounding the innate/acquired learning debate, including the recent work on language acquisition that has arisen subsequent to Noam Chomsky’s seminal writings in this area. Finally, students will have a section on artificial intelligence, considering both historical work, such as that of Alan Turing, and more recent developments in AI. The course will use both lecture and video in presenting the material.

This 3.0 credit course, taught by Daniel Casey, is open to all undergraduate students above the freshman level and will meet Wednesdays, 6 – 8:50 p.m. Location TBD.

ST: Existentialism: Anxiety, Death, Boredom (PHIL T280.002)
Existentialism is a philosophical, literary and artistic movement that emerged as a result of the crumbling of traditional institutions of authority in Europe in the wake of two world wars. Existentialism searches for the meaning and value of existence for the individual and society as a whole, often reacting against philosophy that cannot address the fundamental needs of individual people in their daily lives. In the face of crumbling institutions of authority, how can we find meaning without collapsing into despair? Is boredom the fundamental mood of modern existence? Students will address these questions and others by reading works from Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Heidegger, Sartre, Beauvoir, Fanon and Beckett.

This 3.0 credit course, taught by Adam Knowles, PhD, is open to all undergraduate students above the freshman level, and will meet Tuesdays and Thursdays 2 – 3:20 p.m. Location TBD.

ST: Philosophy as Therapy (PHIL T380.001)
Philosophy has long had a reputation for being completely divorced from practical concerns. Nothing could be further from the truth. The view that philosophy is essentially a type of therapy can be traced back to Plato and was developed even more explicitly in the writings of the three overtly therapeutically oriented philosophical schools of the late classical period: stoicism, skepticism and Epicureanism. This course looks at the ancient approach to “philosophical practice” as exemplified in the work of these early thinkers. The objective is not, however, like that of a traditional course in ancient philosophy. That is, it is not primarily to learn something about ancient philosophy. The objective of this course is to teach students the largely untapped therapeutic potential of this thought. The texts for the course excerpts from Plato’s “Republic,” Aristotle’s “Nicomachean Ethics,” Lucretius’ “De rerum natura,” Marcus Aurelius, “Meditations,” and Sextus Empiricus’ “Outlines of Pyrrhonism.”

This 3.0 credit course, taught by Marilyn Piety, PhD, is open to all undergraduate students above the sophomore level, and will meet Tuesdays and Thursdays, 3:30 – 4:50 p.m. Location TBD.

Political Liberalism and Religion (PHIL T481.001)
This course examines the political theory of John Rawls in light of his early writings on religion, and his concern — in his later theory of Political Liberalism — for religious toleration, and his arguments regarding the reasonableness of religious doctrines in relation to public discourse.

This 3.0 credit course, taught by Carol Mele, PhD, is open to all undergraduate students above the freshman level, with 2 (two) 200-level PHIL courses or the equivalent, and will meet Tuesdays and Thursdays, 3:30-4:50 p.m. Location TBD.

Political Science

ST: Franz Fanon’s Political Thought (PSCI T380.001)
Philosopher, psychiatrist and revolutionary, Frantz Fanon is among the most intriguing figures of the 20th century. This course will explore Fanon's writings and discuss what led a Caribbean-born and French-educated intellectual to join the Algerian Revolution. Films will include “The Battle of Algiers” and “The Hunger Games.”

This 4.0 credit course, taught by George Ciccariello-Maher, PhD is open to all students and will meet Tuesdays Thursdays, 10 – 11:50 a.m. Location TBD.

Science, Technology & Society

ST: Connected Mobility Lab (SCTS T 780.001, COM 690)
This course will address the large-scale transitions toward “sustainable” and “smart” technologies in transportation systems with an emphasis on how new information and communication technologies are transforming or disrupting the transport sector. Unlike other courses, this course will do so through an innovative problem-based, hands-on, interdisciplinary “lab” experience in which students collaborate with others to work on real-world problems and solutions.

This 3.0 credit course, taught by Mimi Sheller, PhD, is open to all graduate students and upper-level undergraduate students with department and adviser approval. It meets Thursdays, 6:30 – 9:20 p.m. Location TBD.

ST: Identity and Intersectionality (SCTS T780.002)
The practices of modern science, technology and medicine are deeply raced and gendered. This class moves beyond studies of singular social categories to explore intersections among individuals/identities (race, class, gender, sexuality, [dis]ability, age, etc.) through critical reading of primary and secondary sources undertaken in a social-science “lab” setting.

This 3.0 credit course, taught by Chloe Silverman, PhD, is open to all graduate students and upper-level undergraduate students with advisor and department approval. It meets Wednesdays, 6 – 8:50 p.m. Location TBD.