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Couple and Family Therapy Department

Diversity Thrives Here

Internationally recognized faculty train culturally aware and culturally sensitive therapists dedicated to serving a diverse client base.

Couple and Family Therapy Department

The Couple and Family Therapy Department prepares students to succeed in today's mental health environment through quality education and clinical preparation. 

We train therapists to be both culturally aware and culturally sensitive. Through our programs, students build an excellent foundation on which to build their future careers in couple and family therapy within the context of a highly culturally diverse marketplace.  

Our internationally recognized faculty are highly respected with expertise in areas such as Culture, Trauma, Medical Family Therapy, Health Policy, Supervision and Training, Forensic Family Therapy, Divorce Mediation, Substance Abuse, Youth and Family Violence, Sex Therapy, Interdisciplinary Healthcare Initiatives, LGBT and Mixed Orientation relationships and EFT.

We invite you to explore the degree programs and certificate programs offered through this department that will help you begin or elevate your career in individual, couple and family therapy. Please explore our web pages for a wealth of information about our programs, students, faculty, research and clinical practice.

Selected MFT applicants are eligible for our Dean’s Scholarship. Additional funding opportunities for MFT and PhD applicants can be found at the AAMFT Research & Education Foundation's Minority Fellowship Program webpage.

Programs

Master of Family Therapy Degree Program
Family therapy: from family of origin to the global community.

Post-Master's Certificate Program in Couple and Family Therapy
Continue your education in couple and family therapy with Drexel's innovative professional training programs.

Doctoral Degree Program in Couple and Family Therapy
The PhD Program in Couple and Family Therapy will prepare you for a career in academia, research, and behavioral healthcare.

Couple and Family Therapy Faculty

View Profiles

Department News

 

05/01/17

A team of health services administration students, all Drexel Society of Future Health Leaders members presented a case at the Health Care Leadership Network  of the Delaware Valley’s (HLNDV) 2nd Annual Student Case competition. Based on a report created by Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics at the University of Pennsylvania abstracts were submitted on solution to the issue of  ‘primary care desserts.’  Competition was tough, as we competed with undergraduate students, as well graduate student from the Philadelphia area .This was a great experience that truly emphasized the importance of teamwork in the world of health care.
 
There were six students, in total, from CNHP. One group included Nick Mahoney, Karol Zhong and Julie Knerr and the other, finishing in second place, included Kelley Martin, Toni Ross and Maureen Dorce. 
 
A paper by health sciences student Taylor Collins and her professor, Krista L. Rompolski, PhD has been published. “Hypothalamic Amenorrhea: Causes, Complications & Controversies” appears in Journal of Student Research in Volume 6, Issue 1.
 
Stella Lucia Volpe, PhD, professor and chair of the Department of Nutrition Sciences, was the recipient of the Distinguished Scholar Award at the Annual Sports, Cardiovascular, and Wellness Nutrition (SCAN) Symposium in Charlotte, North Carolina. The award recognizes Volpe’s outstanding contribution to research in the field of dietetics and her commitment to scholarship.
 
Margaret Finley, PT, PhD, associate professor, Department of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Sciences, is one of six faculty to receive a career development award from the Office of Faculty Affairs for 2017- 2018. The award is designed for tenure-track faculty members to increase their exposure to colleagues at other institutions who will be mentors and collaborators. Finley’s proposal is the "Biopsychosocial Approach to Musculoskeletal Pain with Applications to Spinal Cord Injury." As part of her award activities, Finley will visit the labs of Richard Shields, PT, PhD, FAPTA and Laura Frey Law, PT, PhD at the University of Iowa. Steven George, PT, PhD, Duke University, and Shields will give presentations at Drexel University. Collectively, the mentors will provide a foundation for application of genetic phenotype biomarkers and measurement of psychosocial behaviors in adults with spinal cord injuries. 
 
Ryan J. Clancy, MSHS, MA, PA-C, DFAAPA, clinical instructor in the physician assistant program, has been recognized as a Distinguished Fellow of AAPA. Clancy earned this national recognition due to his outstanding contributions to patient care and the profession during his years as a physician assistant. He also demonstrated significant dedication and involvement in the community of Philadelphia.
 
Health Administration Press (HAP) will be publishing a book co-edited by Stephen F. Gambescia, PhD, MEd, MBA, MHum, MCHES, professor in health services administration about “Managing the Nonprofit Health Organization in the New Economy.” HAP is a leading publisher of health administration and is affiliated with the Association of Health Care Executives (AHCE).
 
CNHP is hosting the 6th Annual Philadelphia Area Simulation Consortium: Assessment and Evaluation in Simulation on June 15, 2017. The consortium provides opportunity for specialty-specific breakout sessions, presentations featuring innovative uses of simulation for education, research, simulation technicians, and administrators; and to promote regional networking for hospital based and academic simulation centers. Key note speakers include Tony Errichetti, PhD, CHSE and Kathie Lasater, EdD, RN, ANEF, FANN.
 
Sherry Goodill, PhD, BC-DMT, NCC, LPC, Creative Arts Therapies department chair, moderated a panel discussion, "The Arts and Healing" on Thursday, April 6 as part of a performance by Jessica Lang Dance at the Prince Theater, presented by NextMove Dance. The panel also included veteran Mike Mulligan, who spoke about his use of the arts in his recovery and healing process. The performance that followed featured all new work by Jessica Lang Dance, including "Thousand Yard Stare," a physically riveting tribute to veterans set to Beethoven's String Quartet #15. The title refers to the blank and bewildered gaze of the shell-shocked soldier returning from war. 
 
The official establishment of The Center for Family Intervention Science (CFIS), the first research center in the College of Nursing and Health Professions was recently announced. The Center is directed by Guy Diamond, PhD, associate professor and faculty member in the Couple and Family Therapy department. The CFIS will foster interprofessional collaborations among faculty interested in research that promotes family strengths and reduces barriers to child and family health and wellbeing. The Center is committed to working with diverse populations throughout the life span and in both university and community settings. PhD students and post-doctoral fellows in the College interested in family-centered interventions will have opportunities to engage in Center activities. The Center will also support training, clinical, and policy-related activities related to family intervention science. 
 
 
Sponsored Research
 
Brandy-Joe Milliron, PhD, assistant professor, Department of Nutrition Sciences was awarded $22,300 for her project Heart Healthy Cooking Lab: Youth Exploring Wellness through Gardening. 
 
Clare Milner, PhD, associate professor, Department of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Sciences, was awarded $14,000 for her project Impact Shock and Risk of Stress Fracture in Walking, Marching and Running. 
 
Both projects involve interprofessional research teams. Funding is for one year. The findings will enable the investigators to apply for extra-mural funding.
 
Ming Yuan Low, student in PhD Program in Creative Arts Therapy was recently awarded a research grant by the Mid-Atlantic Region of the American Music Therapy Association for his study entitled ‘The Music Interaction Scale: Examining Inter-rater Reliability of a New Nordoff-Robbins Scale’. This study will be in collaboration with the AJ Autism Institute at Drexel and the Nordoff-Robbins Music Therapy Center at New York University. Low’s research advisor is Joke Bradt, PhD, MT-BC, Associate Professor, Department of Creative Arts Therapies.
 
 

02/16/17

On January 11, US News and World Report published their 2017 Best Jobs list and 52 of the top 100 are in health care. Nurse practitioner and physician assistant are number two and three on that list with no surprise as the demand for more skilled health care professionals skyrockets. Susannah Snider, personal finance editor at U.S. News said in a press release about the jobs list, "Health care jobs often require a human element, so they can't be exported or entirely replaced by robots – at least not yet.
 
“Continued growth in the health care sector, low unemployment rates and high salaries make these jobs especially desirable. Plus, individuals can pursue a range of health care positions that require varying levels of skill and education," furthered Snider. While the opportunities for PAs and NPs expand practically every specialty — orthopedics, endocrinology, cardiology, pediatrics — a reported 80% of nurse practitioners choose primary care whereas a study from the National Commission on Certification of Physician Assistants (NCCPA) states physician assistants tend to practice outside of primary care. 
 
Regardless of the position a person chooses, it’s all good news for CNHP. The Bureau of Labor and Statistics cited nurse practitioner and physician assistant among the fastest growing occupations with 35% and 30% growth respectively. This expansion can be attributed to a few factors including a move to patient-centered care models and an aging population. But another reason is the expansion of coverage for an additional 20 million people through Affordable Care Act. “The ACA recognized physician assistants as an essential part of the solution to the primary care shortage by formally acknowledging them as one of the three primary care health providers,” said Patrick Auth, PhD, MS, PA-C, CNHP clinical professor and department chair. “They also committed to expanding the number of PAs by providing financial support for scholarships and loan forgiveness programs, as well as by funding the training of 600 new PAs,” he continued.
 
“The Affordable Care Act (ACA) allowed millions of Americans to have access to insurance to pay for the cost of their health care. That meant hospitals and providers reduced their cost of indigent care.  While these figures have presented a hopeful outlook on what new health care reform may mean, one recent report has portrayed a potentially much different outcome.
 
The study conducted by the Commonwealth Fund revealed repealing the ACA, likely starting with the insurance premium tax credits and the expansion of Medicaid eligibility would result in a doubling in the number of uninsured Americans while having widespread economic and employment impacts. In 2019, the study predicts a loss of 2.6 million jobs nation-wide, primarily in the private sector, with around a third of them in the health care industry. Pennsylvania could see around 137,000 jobs lost. 
 
Elizabeth W. Gonzalez, PhD, PMHCNS-BC, associate professor and department chair of the doctoral nursing program and Kymberlee Montgomery, DrNP, CRNP-BC, CNE ’09, associate clinical professor and department chair of the nurse practitioner program, both suggest that it is too early to tell what any real impact will be to healthcare or employment. “The ACA also lowered Medicare spending by allowing people to enter into share savings plans with accountable care organizations where providers are reimbursed based on the quality, not the quantity, of their services,” Gonzalez said. “This emphasis on quality has resulted in significant savings, lower cost of health care for seniors, individuals with disabilities, low income families, and children. The ACA encourages a focus on the patient experience and this has led to some wonderful innovations because clinicians are being paid to focus on ways to enhance the quality of the care they provide patients,” she added. 
 
“The Affordable Care Act introduced patients to the role of the nurse practitioner. Patients were forced to see us for primary care — nurse practitioners provided care at a lower cost,” stated Montgomery. “Now patients want to see us because of the level of care we provided.” There are just so many unknowns where the ACA is concerned. While the current administration seems determined to repeal the law, they haven’t yet put forth a replacement that will provide affordable healthcare for those who would undoubtedly lose what they currently have. It’s uncertain whether a new law might be proposed that would guarantee that no jobs created under the ACA are lost or if patient outcomes will decline.” But both Gonzalez and Montgomery feel that advanced practice nursing will continue to be a cost effective way to deliver outstanding clinical services. While it’s tough to speculate, Montgomery thinks opportunities for nurse practitioners will continue to grow regardless. “Who knows, it might make it better for the nurse practitioner especially because we provide high-quality, comprehensive care at lower costs,” she said.

By: Roberta Perry and Kinzey Lynch `17

 

02/15/16

  • Loretta Sweet Jemmott, PhD, Vice President for Health and Health Equity at Drexel University, has been appointed to Main Line Health’s Board of Governors.

     

  • Vicki Schwartz, DCN, assistant clinical professor in the Nutrition Sciences Department, was inducted as a Fellow of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.

     

  • Integrated Health Care for People with Autism Spectrum Disorder, a book co-authored by Ellen Giarelli, EdD, associate professor in the Doctor of Nursing Practice Department, and Kathleen Fisher, PhD, professor in the Doctor of Nursing Practice Department, was published.

     

  • Essential Procedures for Practitioners in Emergency, Urgent, and Primary Care Settings: Second Edition: A Clinical Companion authored by Theresa Campo, DNP, associate clinical professor and co-director of the family nurse practitioner track, was published.

     

  • Helping Children and Families Cope with Parental Illness: A Clinician’s Guide, a book co-authored by Maureen Davey, PhD, associate professor in the Couple and Family Therapy Department, Karni Kissil and Laura Lynch, two alumni of the PhD in Couple and Family Therapy Program, will be published in April 2016.

     

  • Deeptha Sukumar, PhD, assistant professor in the Nutrition Sciences Department, received a four-year American Heart Association Foundation grant entitled, “Parathyroid Hormone and Cardiometabolic Outcomes in Obesity: Role of Magnesium and Vitamin D Supplementation”.

     

  • Patty Gerrity, PhD, professor and associate dean for Community Programs, accepted an invitation to speak at the First National Nursing Leadership Conference being held in DC, April 2016.

     

  • Julie Kinzel, clinical assistant professor in the Physician Assitant Department, is the recipient of the Physician Assistant Educator of the Year Award from the Pennsylvania Society of Physician Assistants (PSPA).

     

  • Megan Schneider, clinical instructor in the Physician Assistant Department, was nominated for the Rising Star Award by the Physician Assistant Education Association.

     

  • Adrian Banning, MMS, assistant clinical professor in the Physician Assistant Department, was nominated as an outstanding leader in the health field in Philadelphia and was featured on BillyPenn.com.

     

    CNHP in the media:

  • Drexel’s online Doctor of Nursing Programwas featured on Biz Philly after it is named one of the top 50 in the country by Best Medical Degrees.
  • Adrian S. Banning, MMS,assistant clinical professor in the Physician Assistant Department, was featured among Billy Penn Who’s Next in Health.
  • The Stephen and Sandra Sheller 11th Street Family Health Serviceswas featured in the Philadelphia Business Journal for receiving a grant from AstraZeneca for its “R-Health: Building Resilience for Life-Long Health” program.
  • Drexel University was named as one of the top 10 best U.S. colleges for a nursing degree by USA Today.
  • Drexel University's Health Sciences Departmentand Salus University's Occupational Therapy Department were featured inAdvance Healthcare Network for their partnership that will offer a sequential degree program.
  • Jennifer Nasser, PhD,associate professor in the Department of Nutrition Sciences, was featured in Obesity Society  for her research in the area of brain response to food stimulation.
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