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Development of a Cardiac Left Heart Simulator for Prosthetic Valve Evaluation

Tuesday, April 25, 2017

12:00 PM-2:00 PM

BIOMED Master's Thesis Defense

Title:
Development of a Cardiac Left Heart Simulator for Prosthetic Valve Evaluation

Speaker:
Gabrielle Toner, MS Candidate, School of Biomedical Engineering, Science and Health Systems

Advisors:
Dr. Steven Kurtz, PhD, Associate Research Professor, School of Biomedical Engineering, Science and Health Systems

Dr. Marek Swoboda, PhD, Assistant Teaching Professor, School of Biomedical Engineering, Science and Health Systems

Abstract:
The advancement of prosthetic heart valves has played a critical role in solving diseased valve states and alleviating patient pain. After the birth of the mechanical ball valve 50 years ago, prosthetic heart valve replacements have drastically evolved for both mitral and aortic designs due to use of alternative mechanical materials and the progression of transcatheter options.

Prosthetic valves undergo extensive in vitro testing (pulse duplication) to qualify and verify the device’s design prior to clinical trials, and testing requirements are presented in International Standards Organization (ISO) 5840:3:2014. Currently, pulse duplicators have been published by a few academic labs, and companies have manufactured commercialized systems. However, in order to do in-house prosthetic valve analysis for a range of valve designs, an internal system must be built that allows increased user input.

The aims of this research project are to develop a cardiac pulse duplicator to characterize aortic prosthetic valves and to validate the model using criteria developed from the ISO guidelines and literature. The benchtop design includes a driving mechanism comprised of an MTS MiniBionix 858 load frame and a bellow adapted from the TA Electroforce Stent Graft Tester. Simulating cardiac pressures and flows, the system can be tuned to various valve sizes and designs. Pulse duplication is an essential step in the development of prosthetic valves, and the finalization of this system will have a direct effect on the development of the heart valve field.

Contact Information

Ken Barbee
215-895-1335
barbee@drexel.edu

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Location

Bossone Research Center, Room 709, located at 32nd and Market Streets.

Audience

  • Undergraduate Students
  • Graduate Students
  • Faculty
  • Staff