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Autism Public Health Lecture Series

The signature event of the Autism Institute is the annual Autism & Public Health Lecture, a speaker series that brings top researchers to Philadelphia to talk about the latest in public health research on autism. Lectures are always open to the wider community and offer researchers the opportunity to engage with a general audience on the implications of their research. 

A Tale of Traffic and Smog: How the Air We Breathe Can Affect the Developing Brain

Dr. Heather Volk

March 29, 2016 - Behrakis Grand Hall, Drexel University

Dr. Heather Volk

Dr. Heather Volk highlighted recent findings from population-based research studies and explored how such findings may help inform etiologic research, as well as prevention efforts. In her talk, she reviewed the current literature spanning human and animal studies on what is currently known about air pollution effects on the developing brain and ASD. Dr. Volk’s research and work seeks to answer the questions, “How does prenatal and early life air pollution exposure affect the developing brain? What relevance does this have for Autism Spectrum Disorder?”

Slides from Dr. Volk's talk are available here. 

Parent-Mediated Intervention in ASD:  Challenges and Opportunities

Dr. Brooke Ingersoll

March 25, 2015 - Nesbitt Hall: Ruth Auditorium, Drexel University

Brooke IngersollDr. Ingersoll presented an overview of parent-mediated intervention for young children with ASD, with a focus on the current evidence base. She discussed challenges with the dissemination and implementation of existing evidence-supported models in community settings. Dr. Ingersoll considers the potential for increasing community adoption of parent-mediated approaches through the use of alternative development and evaluation framework, using examples from Project ImPACT, a community-focused parent-mediated intervention, to highlight key concepts.

Evidence Based Employment Intervention Models: Pathways to Competitive Employment for Youth with Autism

Dr. Paul Wehman

March 19, 2014 - Paul Peck Alumni Center, Drexel University
 

Dr. Wehman discussed how unemployment for young people with autism is a serious problem and how there are some approaches that are beginning to be used with success to alter the landscape on this problem. He discussed how long term internships, supported employment, customized employment, supported post-secondary education and small business models are each being adapted or developed for individuals with autism with an emphasis on those with high support needs.

Autism and the Transition to Adulthood: New Findings, New Questions

Dr. Paul Shattuck

March 21, 2013 - A.J. Drexel Picture Gallery, Drexel University
 

Paul ShattuckIt is widely known that 1) increasing numbers of children are being identified as having autism, 2) children grow up to be adults, and 3) the majority of a typical lifespan is spent in adulthood. However, adulthood is the phase of life we know by far the least about when it comes to autism spectrum disorders – a condition that likely affects several million adults and accounts for more than $35 billion in direct and indirect costs in the U.S. annually. Our evidence base is woefully thin with respect to understanding the service needs for the adult population with autism and the range of health and social outcomes they typically experience. Autism may be impacting an increasingly large proportion of the adult population, yet most studies have been based on extremely small samples. Dr. Shattuck shared findings from his research, which has emphasized national-level data, on youth as they age from adolescence to adulthood. He explored indicators related to employment, education, services, and social participation and addresses the pressing question: How does life turn out for individuals with autism after they leave high school?

For more information about the Autism Public Health Lecture Series, please email AutismInstitute@drexel.edu